Surgery

A few months back I had this dream. Nothing but water all around– I was walking on a rickety boardwalk, wearing my light blue surgery scrubs. I could taste the sea. The ocean spray on my face. My body was haggard. It was with my last ounce of strength that I moved my legs. I lifted my hands, they floated there for a moment, the breeze kissing my fingertips. I felt free. 

I imagined finishing 8 weeks of surgery would feel just like that–a release perfectly timed with my last bit of strength. So many mornings waking up at 5 am I cursed the path I had chosen. Cranky that I could not crawl back into my warm bed (it would sit empty for another 18 hours) instead I was off to the hospital. When you are in the thick of it–that release is all you can think of. Now that I made it–mostly what I feel is nostalgia.  It is funny how quickly you forget the tired mornings and late nights. All I remember now are the exhilarating highs.

Surgery was the most fun I’ve had in medical school.

I will not be a surgeon. I am going into Emergency Medicine and knowing that this rotation will likely be the only time that I’ll be spending in the OR, made it that much more exciting. I transformed from a clueless 3rd year med student, hands shaky, stupidly holding my needle driver like scissors…to a confident, somewhat less-clueless surgical student. By the end of two months I was able to read ventilator settings, remove chest tubes, tie knots, close a surgical wound nice enough to have the ultimate of critics–the scrub nurse–utter the words “beautiful.” I could prepare for rounds in 30 minutes flat, knowing every lab, urine output, nutritional status, vital sign and Flowtrack indicator for my patients. This training came at an incredible price. I stayed late. Studied even later. And walked around for 8 weeks sore as hell.

I will never forget the cases I came across. Terrible calamities. Now part of my training forever. A stabbing in the middle of the night. Gun shot wounds. Flesh eating bacteria. Total body burns. Fulminant sepsis. Amputations. Tumor in the heart. Every day I felt lucky to have the privilege of being in that OR.

Of all the specialties surgery will always have a special place in my heart. It was the only one that gave me pause. Ultimately, it is not right for me, but this rotation will be one I won’t soon forget.

 

 

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Filed under Medical School Experience, Rotations, Uncategorized

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