Category Archives: Medical School Logistics

Finally here

Last week was a momentous occasion. I clicked submit on my ERAS application. Sitting in bed with my laptop, re-reading my residency application for the 10th time, I took a deep breath and hit submit. Everything I have done in medical school to ensure I Match in the residency of my choice came down to one click. Ah. Relief.

I can’t believe I actually made it here. It was the hardest thing I’ve ever worked on–becoming a doctor. While at the same time, the most fun I’ve ever had. I feel so lucky that I found my true passion in life.

Going for it wasn’t easy, or convenient, or even rational at the time I decided to enroll in my night organic chemistry class while working full-time. But I never looked back. Of course, I would have never been as gutsy without my boyfriend (now husband) telling me I would be crazy not to do it. When I talked about medicine (and it was pretty much all I talked about to him), my eyes would shine and reveal that fiery glow–he knew I would never be satisfied if I didn’t try (and I may never stop talking about it either). Girls: if you ever find a guy like that–don’t let him go!

Nine years later, here I am. Happy to say, I am just as passionate about medicine (and my guy).

Now that my apps are in and I’m done with my EM sub-I’s, I am currently enjoying a magical time known as 4th year of medical school. In the future, when nostalgia creeps up on me and I reminisce about medical school, I will think only of my 4th year and how wonderful life was. Of how happy, well-rested and fulfilled I was. This year makes all of the memories of stress, the lack of sleep, the endless book chapters, weekly exams, PIMPing sessions, awkward patient interactions, fumbling sutures, idiot mistakes, and otherwise feeling dumb–disappear. All I will remember is the amazing amount of free time I had during my 4th year of medical school.

I intend on taking full advantage of this amazing gift.

My husband and I just celebrated our 4 year wedding anniversary. Throughout our relationship we’ve constantly set goals and dreams of the type of life we want…”when this, then that.” Medicine is notorious for insisting on delayed gratification. But it dawned on us that life is what happens when you are busy making plans. Rather than planning ahead we are making an effort to just enjoy today.

Our priority for this year is simple–one word:travel. Now that I have time on my side we are excited to catch up on some well-deserved vacations.  I also realize that residency will be an extraordinarily tough 3-4 years and the time I have this year is precious. As it happens, things couldn’t have been better timed as there are some seriously exciting things happening in our families–including the birth of two nieces!

Here is to continuing my 4th year adventures…next stop: residency interviews!

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Away Rotations Explained

All across the United States during the months of July-September, 4th year medical students leave the familiarity of their home institutions and spend time on away rotations. What are these rotations you ask? Well, you can think of them as month long interviews. If you’ve ever been to an interview and thought a few hours with your potential boss was nerve wracking–try spending 30 days there.

For those of you unfamiliar with how your doctor got his job, the path towards becoming a bonafide, board-certified physician in any specialty starts with residency training–and residency starts with something called the Match. How do you get to the Match?–you interview at multiple training sites and then you rank them. The training sites rank all the candidates they interviewed and in the end a super secret, proprietary computer formula spits out a theoretical Match made in heaven.

The away rotations come in for several reasons. One is to simply get to know a program you may want spend 3-7 years training at and the other is to get letters of recommendation so that these places want to interview you! Either way, these away rotations can kind of make or break your application.

The whole process is fascinating to me because so much of your life is decided for you. When you apply for the Match you also sign a binding contract saying that whatever the computer decides is where you’ll go. You are locked in and you don’t even know where you are going. It’s kind of like that name your own price tool on Priceline. You put in your credit card info and if it matches what you are looking for you are committed to going there– yeah…well this is just a really long hotel stay.  Again, away rotations are that much more important because you get to picture yourself at that institution. You get a test run.

I just had my first away rotation. I have to say, I got pretty darn lucky.

The nervousness of being at a new hospital with a new computer system and all new hallways to get lost in was short-lived. I don’t know if it’s the 300 days of sunshine, the beautiful beaches or the focus on work-life-balance but I have never seen such happy attendings and residents. I really did my best searching out for the grumpiest, unhappiest guy in the bunch, thinking he’d be the best person to ask what is terrible about the program–but I never found him.

I imagined that I would show up and be just another face in the crowd, blending into a sea of medical students that rotated before me. Instead I got a super warm welcome and genuine interest from everyone I came across. If you accepted their challenge this place really allowed you to step into the shoes of resident intern, pushing you to think of yourself not as a medical student but the doctor you will be in a matter of months. I absolutely thrive in that environment. Give me an inch and I’ll just run with it. Having someone put trust in my assessments, physical exams, ultrasound findings and differential makes me work that much harder. Every day I showed up and tried to push myself a little further. That attitude does not go unnoticed so as a result I had some amazing training opportunities.

I’m really glad that my first Emergency Medicine rotation was at my home institution. It was a safe place to fall a little bit and get helped up along the way. EM is a very different specialty and it takes some time to get used to the focused exams, presentation style and the way EM physicians think. My home institution prepared me extremely well in pointing out what I was doing wrong in those aspects. I had some  wonderful residents who provided actual constructive criticism. Even though it is hard to hear that you forgot something obvious, I can promise you that the next time I have a patient with a headache I will never forget to walk them and check their gait before presenting to the attending. By the time I arrived at my away rotation I had the basics firmly in hand and could start to build on my skills.

During my month away, I came across another group of amazing teachers. People with genuine excitement about working with physicians in training. You can’t fake that kind of attitude and it was contagious. As a result I can now say that I’m entering residency having done two lumbar punctures, a chest tube placement, an intubation, a thoracentesis, a paracentesis, a cervical headache block and that I&D I somehow missed earlier. That in itself is amazing training!

The best part about 4th year has been rotating in my actual specialty and feeling like I am among my own. People who share my enthusiasm for crashing patients, multi tasking, having a good sense of humor and being accepting of anyone and everyone.

I have grown tremendously in the past month as a student, which is all I could ask for. I am really looking forward to one more away rotation…and another opportunity to keep improving.

 

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Back to reality

Welp, it’s time to put those yoga pants away and trade them back in for my light blue scrubs. After 6 weeks of break setting an alarm again is torture. I am definitely feeling out of practice–especially since I am diving right back into the shark tank with my Surgery rotation. I was assigned to the cardiothoracic service and I can imagine those are not sissy surgeries. My days will be filled with open heart surgery, lung resections and endless CABG procedures (coronary artery bypass grafts). I am a mixture of terrified and excited. However, if I am going to wake up at 4 am for something, surgery pretty much tops the list. Being in the OR is unlike anything I’ve ever done. It is an adrenaline rush, a stopper of time–it drains you of every ounce of energy, yet leaves you curiously wanting to come back and do it all over again. I am preparing myself for the most physically and mentally exhausting 8 weeks of my life. Good thing I just had a seriously long vacation.

I made the most of the last 6 weeks managing to jam pack it with travel, family & friends, a little work and even an elective! Here are the highlights:

  • Spent the holidays with my family in Maryland
  • Took a road trip to NYC
  • Finished the whole House of Cards series, finished the whole The Knick series, finished the whole Making a Murder Series, caught up on all the various versions of Bravo’s Real Housewives
  • Wrote two papers for publication!
  • About 75 Surgery practice questions…
  • Started a Go Fund Me campaign
  • Did some voice over work for a promotional video
  • Did some design work and drafted an Annual Report for one of my clients
  • Got my nails painted by a professional!
  • Went shopping and refreshed my wardrobe with some killer boots, a couple of amazing dresses and the perfect lace ensemble for my best-friend’s summer wedding
  • Completed my first thoracotomy and learned how to place a chest tube (on a generously donated cadaver)
  • Booked my trip to Las Vegas, where I’ll be presenting two abstracts
  • Convinced my husband to come to Las Vegas with me (this took 5 seconds)
  • Went wine tasting in Napa with my girlfriends of almost 20 years
  • Explored San Francisco like a champ
  • Made a couple EM podcasts which are part of the Residency curriculum at my Medical School
  • Did a photoshoot with my awesome friend and a guest appearance on her YouTube channel
  • Slept in, a lot
  • Started running regularly again
  • Finished decorating our living room with some amazing photography from my father in law
  • Went on lots of overdue doctor’s appointments and other things regular people do not typically wait for a vacation to complete
  • Did a couple shifts in the ED–spending time in my favorite place in the hospital
  • Ate a lot of really amazing food
  • Forgot for 6 weeks how difficult it is to be a third year med student

Fun is over friends. Time to get back to reality.

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